Climate Activism in the Caribbean

Overall rating: 9 based on 1 reviews

Program Description

The RVA Climate Change Conference 2012-2021 Program
https://richmondvale.org/en/courses/climate-compliance-6-months
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, after years of climate change related effects, was devastated by the severe weather disasters of 2010 and 2011.
In response, Richmond Vale Academy (RVA) initiated a program called “The Saint Vincent Climate Compliance Conference 2012 – 2021” (CCC). This program has been a platform from which a springboard of hope has been built; to enable and empower several groups and communities. This program has accomplished widespread tree planting, teaching farmers sustainable agriculture, teaching climate change compliance to thousands of students, producing and distributing scores of climate change leaflets and newspapers, starting sustainable home gardens, setting up biogas digesters, impacting thousands of people in Saint Vincent and abroad.

Richmond Vale Academy works alongside the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines to reach the Climate Compliance goals.

Established in 2002, the Richmond Vale Academy (RVA) is a registered non-profit research and training institution situated in the Chateaubelair area of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG). Since opening, students from this country and from around the world have participated in courses centred on poverty reduction, environmental conservation and climate change awareness.

Highlights

Implementing projects like home gardens with families.
Improve your knowledge about Global Warming and Climate Change.
Hiking the Volcano La Soufriere.
Preparing and holding an Open Day for all the people you worked with.
Building a strong team spirit to combat any problems.

Qualifications

There's no special requirements but you should be open-minded and be ready to work!
We have a no drugs no alcohol policy that we ask you to abide by.

Volunteer Types

Environment

What`s Included

3 meals a day, all program costs covered, Wireless connection, all the fruits you can eat and so much more.
You will be part of making organic home gardens. Watch movie below.
Much of the food available in St. Vincent is imported and full of chemicals, evident in the synthetic additives now commonly placed in our food. This is neither environmentally or financially sustainable, or climate smart as much of this food is not healthy.
Home gardens are a crucial element to protect and promote biodiversity.

Other Programs From The Same Provider

10 Months Fighting Poverty Program
10 Months Fighting Poverty Program
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Chateaubelair

Program Locations

Chateaubelair, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

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Overall rating 
9
Experience
10
Program Administration
8
Living Conditions
8
Cultural Immersion
8
Social Life
10
Health and Safety
10
Review This Program

Program Details

Provider:
Richmond Vale Academy
Location
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: Chateaubelair
Terms:
Throughout the year
Program Duration:
1-3 months, 3-6 months
Languages:
English
Participants:
Worldwide
Cost:
3200 for 6 Months and 1100 for 1 Month

Other Related Programs

  • Dear applicants, we encourage you to leave a personal review if you have ever taken part in this program. Leaving a review will help fellow travelers to decide where to go and which program to go with as they plan their trip abroad.
    Review this program
    Where do you go and what do you do when you want to become a climate change activist? When you start watching a lot of documentaries, understanding what is happening in the world, asking yourself about your role in society, and wondering how we ended up there, then it’s time to take a step towards a different lifestyle. It doesn’t have to be as radical as moving to the Caribbean, though that’s the choice I made.

    Climate change...what a vast subject. It feels like each and every action that we take in our comfortable western lives leads to this. We are indoctrinated with the belief that we need to always buy more, so we always produce more and then we just always throw away more. This remark from a friend still resonates with me: “You’re throwing this away. But there is no Away!” We are taught to put things in waste bins and once our waste is in there, well, we stop thinking about it altogether. We are completely disconnected and nobody is held responsible for the waste we produce.

    I wanted to act and make a difference in the world, at my scale. I know that I won’t change the world on my own, but by working along with all the little “ants of change,” it might be possible to make things move. That’s why I think it’s time for me to listen to the wise who say, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” (Gandhi)
    Participating in one of RVA’s programs means being part of a team of 2 to 30 people from all over the world and that means adapting to very different ways of thinking, different ways of working. Some traditions or ways of expressing our feelings and emotions and passing on messages vary greatly from culture to culture. Something that you would normally say or do in your country might upset someone from a different culture and it can result in conflicts. A conflicts can be challenging to deal with as it soon becomes a global/public matter in the small community. As amazing and beautiful as it is, living at RVA brings its fair share of challenges and can sometimes be overwhelming, but it is all well worth it.
    Living at RVA means giving up some of your usual comfort. For many of us, we have lived in a home with our family and then moved out to our own place like a flat or a house. Most of us had access to our own bathroom and a nice kitchen in which we could prepare whatever we fancied. Coming to RVA, you start by sharing a room, which most of us have not done for a very long time. That can create some difficulties in the beginning, as you get to share with a total stranger. This is a real challenge for some of us. But because we come here for a specific purpose we all work together to make it functional.
    Spending six months at RVA was a way for me to define and explore possibilities for the future. I know that I don’t want to go back to a society that pushes me to be someone that I’m not. I don’t want to purchase dead things, wear make-up, and have a job that will benefit only a few. I want to change my lifestyle, live closer to the earth and nature, plant trees, and walk barefoot. Being part of a team, learning about the issues of the world, working in the gardens at RVA and in the village, meeting the local community, creating relationships with very different people is a very enriching experience that everybody should have the chance to live.
    Avatar Camille Bru

    Beautiful human experience

    Review by: Camille Bru , On: 26 Sep 2019, Changed On: 26 Sep 2019 | Yes, I would recommend this program
    Where do you go and what do you do when you want to become a climate change activist? When you start watching a lot of documentaries, understanding what is happening in the world, asking yourself about your role in society, and wondering how we ended up there, then it’s time to take a step towards a different lifestyle. It doesn’t have to be as radical as moving to the Caribbean, though that’s the choice I made.

    Climate change...what a vast subject. It feels like each and every action that we take in our comfortable western lives leads to this. We are indoctrinated with the belief that we need to always buy more, so we always produce more and then we just always throw away more. This remark from a friend still resonates with me: “You’re throwing this away. But there is no Away!” We are taught to put things in waste bins and once our waste is in there, well, we stop thinking about it altogether. We are completely disconnected and nobody is held responsible for the waste we produce.

    I wanted to act and make a difference in the world, at my scale. I know that I won’t change the world on my own, but by working along with all the little “ants of change,” it might be possible to make things move. That’s why I think it’s time for me to listen to the wise who say, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” (Gandhi)
    Participating in one of RVA’s programs means being part of a team of 2 to 30 people from all over the world and that means adapting to very different ways of thinking, different ways of working. Some traditions or ways of expressing our feelings and emotions and passing on messages vary greatly from culture to culture. Something that you would normally say or do in your country might upset someone from a different culture and it can result in conflicts. A conflicts can be challenging to deal with as it soon becomes a global/public matter in the small community. As amazing and beautiful as it is, living at RVA brings its fair share of challenges and can sometimes be overwhelming, but it is all well worth it.
    Living at RVA means giving up some of your usual comfort. For many of us, we have lived in a home with our family and then moved out to our own place like a flat or a house. Most of us had access to our own bathroom and a nice kitchen in which we could prepare whatever we fancied. Coming to RVA, you start by sharing a room, which most of us have not done for a very long time. That can create some difficulties in the beginning, as you get to share with a total stranger. This is a real challenge for some of us. But because we come here for a specific purpose we all work together to make it functional.
    Spending six months at RVA was a way for me to define and explore possibilities for the future. I know that I don’t want to go back to a society that pushes me to be someone that I’m not. I don’t want to purchase dead things, wear make-up, and have a job that will benefit only a few. I want to change my lifestyle, live closer to the earth and nature, plant trees, and walk barefoot. Being part of a team, learning about the issues of the world, working in the gardens at RVA and in the village, meeting the local community, creating relationships with very different people is a very enriching experience that everybody should have the chance to live.
    Overall rating 
    9
    Experience
    10
    Program Administration
    8
    Living Conditions
    8
    Cultural Immersion
    8
    Social Life
    10
    Health and Safety
    10

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